Skip to content

The Thing about On-screen Interviews…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I have done a few interviews in my time – usually to get the information for a written piece or for quotes to go with a photo story but never on film for a doccie.

Turns out that – as a rookie – setting up can be as daunting for the interviewer as it is for the interviewee.  The whole process transforms completely and to be honest – works against everything that helps make for a free-flowing sound interview.  For any broadcast journo this is all of course obvious and part and parcel of the job – but not being used to the process it is interesting to quickly go over a few of the issues I faced:

The first thing that changes is the ease with which I was used to communicating with any subject – with video – even the basic canon 5d mk II set up – you suddenly create a whole host of barriers to simple fluid communication and the interview becomes a slave very much to the technology that sits between you.

For starters there are a couple of glaring continuous 800W lights on the subject and extra film crew hovering just out of shot that makes the subject and interviewer less at ease – Mostly though – the prob with on-camera interviews are things like the fact that you suddenly have to ask the subject to paraphrase questions continuously (as I’ve said before the piece will focus on first person narrative and talking heads.. my voice won’t be on the film).

This then means that you have to stop and start sometimes which breaks the ease and flow of natural conversation.  Being constantly still and quiet on the set as well so audio doesn’t pick up any extraneous noise is also an issue for someone like me who fidgets and moves a lot naturally.

Simply put – the problem with on-film interviews is that the process itself gets so much in the way.  For a piece that is all about examining the emotions of those working on the front line of child assault cases, it is proving to be an issue and I am looking to work round this.  Ultimately, I think sacrificing some technical polish from interviews for more comfort and better on-screen reactions from the interviewees is def worth it.

In this case, it was lucky therefore that our subject – Dr Genine Josias – one of the forensic doctors involved in the project has a great presence and is natural and calm (more so than I am!) in front of the camera.  This made the process more relaxed and much easier to handle.  My film crew are also much at ease and helped also put Genine in a good space.

Two old tricks that came in handy – common to broadcast interviewers – that work very well is:

1/ The pregnant pause:  After an answer always give the subject time to add more.  Never ask the next question immediately.  This technique is especially useful with professionals who are used to the interview process. It is usually during these simulated moments of discomfort that the best and most unique answers can be attained.

2/ Get to chat and connect with the subject beforehand.  This greatly helps to put them at ease.  In my case, I have years of contact with many of the subjects on the film so this is not a problem.  But certainly, with people that I don’t know so much, it is worth sitting down and having informal chats with them before the whole circus begins.

Our next interview situation will be with front line service counsellors and we have the added dimension that a Xhosa interpreter will be used.

Success with the tv interview process all comes down to putting the interviewee at ease in my humble opinion.  The more time I have doing this, I am sure the better it will get.  Whatever though – I do feel much more at ease behind the camera and can’t wait to get back to where I belong!

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: