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Hangberg and a different type of photography

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Been a while since I last blogged but that’s not to say haven’t been busy.

I’ve hired an assistant to help me out with all the backlog of work  I had accumulated and was dreading to face – mainly helping with the cleaning and keywording of stock library images (which is not what I think she had in mind when she took the job – imagining exciting adrenaline-fuelled work and the such!).  I’ve strengthened my relationship with AMO who I love working with and also began engaging with a lot more with Alamy.

Apart from taking the whole stock library income stream seriously, I’ve also pushed forward on a couple of long-term photographic ideas and brought them through from conceptualisation, to proposal stage and have begun shooting them – one in Hangberg, a poor coloured community set in an amazingly stunning surrounding near where I live. And another in the Karoo – a vast desert expanse north of Cape Town.

The doccie on front-line services working on child rape took a break for a few months.  There have been a few problems concerning access that I have been dealing with and decided to stand back for a bit because the mild pressure I was applying had become counter-productive.  We have decent emotive general interviews now with all the key players except the police in Khayelitsha but what we really need to do is to follow a couple of cases through the system which is proving harder to do.

There is an ongoing Commission of Enquiry into the police force in Khaye at the mo looking into the high level of vigilantism in the township and looking at why the police force may not be stepping into the security vacuum.  This has managed to irk the police there no end and has lead to them being a lot more reticent in allowing access to media and the such.  I think it will happen but in the meantime we have been filming at the Thuthuzela Centre in Port Elizabeth where access is a lot more open.  Doing so has given me untold headaches though in terms of having to re-focus the short doccie away from Khayelitsha which was the main scope and re-writing the entire documentary script to incorporate all of this.

In the meantime, I was happy to work with the journalist Claire Simpson on a piece that gave a bit of publicity on the forthcoming short doccie in Vice magazine (UK) which can be seen here:

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/a-lot-of-children-are-being-raped-in-south-africas-biggest-township

As for the photo projects, Hangberg is tentatively ready to put up here (which I have done above) although I realise I am still a very long way off from completion of the project.

I’ve done a lot of blogging about how I would like to evolve my work away from news photography into more long-term book and gallery exhibition projects.  Well – finally I can put my photos where my mouth is.  This is the first such project I am undertaking and has been a great joy to shoot as I’ve always wanted access into Hangberg.  Going back to the Benefits of Teaching Photography blogs I wrote – well, I managed to gain access through one of my more prodigious students I worked with on one of the courses I taught through the local charity Lalela and who now regularly works with me as my assistant in Hangberg.  I will be doing more teaching with Lalela and look forward to the opportunity to work with the kids again.

As for my assistant in Hangberg, he has been a masterstroke and am so happy I had the opp to meet him.  I sometimes walk into his house not knowing whether I will be beaten up or whether he will assist me – such is the look of anger on his face – but he is a solid – ‘all I’ve got in this world are balls and my word and I don’t break them for no-one’ type and trust him completely – so much so that I decided to shoot the project on my Hassleblad.

I have wondered whether it would have been better to shoot the Karoo desert project with the Hassleblad and the Hangberg project with my Canon 5D MkII (soon to be upgraded to MK III – can’t wait to use the new AF system – finally Canon have got it spot on!).  I originally thought that using the Hassleblad in Hangberg would force me somehow to slow down and take more static images rather than working with the faster and more dynamic Canons which would lead to more new-sy type images – smthg I of course have been trying to get away from.  The results have partly vindicated the decision but I have lost a lot of decent images there too mainly in very low-light conditions and esp at night where the Hassleblad struggles and where at ISO 800 (the max on the H4D-40) a lot of noise is introduced into the images.

I worry sometimes that the old reflexes as a news photographer didn’t come to play in the decision to employ the Hassleblad, simply so I can prove to myself I can walk around with it there –  Hassleblad may have got a camera on the moon (their own marketing blurb) but I bet they’ve never had one in Hangberg type thing!

I’ve had one or two hairy moments there – a gangster there told me outright he was going to steal my camera – when I laughed nervously he told me he was in fact very serious – I told him I knew he was but knew also that Denrico (my assistant there) is well-respected in the community and I was safe for now.  The gangster said as much.  Anyway – he was gracious enough to let me photograph him and I have given him A4 prints in return for the favour and we often greet each other now amicably enough.

As I’ve said – there is a long way to go with the Hangberg project but I am happy to put some of the images up now.  I have found the road away from my old type of work long and hard but without any initial feedback – I am happy with the new direction I am taking and with the type of work I am beginning to put out.  I am excited to get the short doccie finished too and know once that (and the Karoo photographic project) is complete, my shift will have been complete and I will be able to offer a new style and services to potential clients.

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2 Comments Post a comment
  1. ilse sales #

    Dear George
    I find these fascinating. Louder than words! The irony captured in so many of the photgraphs is what I picked up most. Really good!

    17/03/2013
    • Thanks Ilse! Appreciate your comment – and yes – irony-rich for sure – borne out of the contrast between the amazing beauty of the place and the poverty of large areas of Hangberg… very interesting place and people…

      17/03/2013

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